Monday, July 1, 2013

Common Core Cans {and Giveaway!}



Confession: What I am about to share with you is perhaps my favorite product I've created to date. I am sooo excited to share it with you!

I initially created it as part of an incentive program. Like yours I’m sure, my students love stickers and rewards. I’ve tried homework incentive plans where students would receive a sticker for bringing back completed homework. However, I found that in my district, only the students whose parents helped complete the homework, brought it back. Thus, my students who did not have very structured home-lives rarely received stickers. :-(


So…to "level the playing field" in a sense, I created these Common Core Cans. At the end of every session, each student pulls a question out from his/her corresponding can. My students know exactly which can to pull from. If they are able to answer the question correctly, they receive a sticker. Once they receive 10 stickers, they can pick out of my prize box. It’s a win-win! They are working on skills and I know I’m addressing the Common Core Standards. (Pssss….administrators love it as well!)

This adorable (and easy) K-5 packet contains:
*1 set of labels
*64 K-1 Questions
*64 2-3 Questions
*64 4-5 Questions
*48 Articulation Questions
*Blank Questions

Each question identifies the standard being addressed! For more information on Common Core State Standards (CCSS), click HERE.

*Tip-you know I love anyone who supports my little store. If you had previously bought and downloaded my Common Core Summer Packets, these contain very similar questions. Simply download the preview for the free labels and use them to make your cans for free!


Now for the fun part-assembling the cans!
Here is what I did:
1. Grab 4 cans. Since my husband works at Smucker's, I grabbed up some of their coffee brand. I'm such a supportive wife :-)


2. This step is important-make sure the cans are not sharp! Coffee cans with plastic lids generally are not. 



3  Decorate your cans (if you want). I love scrapbooking so I hot-glued some papr to them but the labels I provide are adorable simply on their own. 



4. Attach the corresponding labels to them. Then, cut out question strips and fold them, placing them in corresponding can. I have to say, I had so many question strips that they would not all fit into my small can. It's perfect though because I can switch them out midyear. 


5. Students pick out questions to answer. 


I'm can't wait to implement this system in my room next year! It takes fewer than 2 minutes per session and what better way to easily answer the question "How do you implement the new Common Core Standards in your therapy?" Find this product now in my TPT store or my Teacher's Notebook Store.

I'm soo excited about this product, I'm giving 3 away! Enter below for a chance to win!


a Rafflecopter giveaway

63 comments:

  1. I've used sticker charts as well. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't.

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  2. For my students, they work towards a common group goal at the end of each grading period. This was the easiest incentive I found as I worked with middle school students.

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    1. I like it! That way it is a group effort and peers can influence instead of me!

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  3. This is a great idea! I also use sticker charts/treasure box. I have the same problem with many students not returning homework.

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  4. I use a points system with my elementary school kids and stickers for the littles in Head Start. After so many points/stickers, they get a trip to the reward bucket.

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  5. I use a star chart and every few spaces the students receives either a sticker or a prize! It keeps them motivated!

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  6. I use that Speechopoly board and the kids love it, they have requested it again for next year!

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    1. Danielle is awesome, isn't she? I love the board she made as well!

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  7. I love this Allison! I integrate the English/LA common core in my therapy sessions all the time. I use my vocabulary task cards that I created plus tons of other resources. You can read about it on my blog....bslspeechlanguage.blogspot.com

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  8. I use sticker charts. This is a great activity, thanks for the giveaway!

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  9. I use sticker charts, but this seems way more fun!

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  10. This is a fabulous idea!!! love it and I love your blog!!

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  11. I have used stickers mostly, but would love to find something different!

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  12. In the past I have used sticker rewards for good behavior and homework. I love this idea! It is unique and it is always great to tie in the Common Core!

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  13. I love the concept of leveling the playing field for the children that you work with. They struggle with enough already! These look both fun and very functional.

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  14. I use sticker charts for good behavior. They earn 1 sticker per 15 minutes of therapy. If they do something extra special, they also can earn a "fluffy" to put in my kiss your brain jar.

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  15. Most of my students have significant social/emotional needs, so my students earn according to the PBIS program that we have school wide as well as students' FBAs/BIPs.

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  16. I use a sticker chart in their speech books for rewards for bringing their speech book, completing homework, good listening skills, and trying their best. But in addition my articulation students can also participate in a 100 day challenge --- if they complete 100 days for consecutive 2-5 minutes of daily practice they can choose a prize from the "100 day" prize box.

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    1. Love the idea of a 100 day challenge that they work for long-term. Thanks!

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  17. I use sticker charts for behavior.

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  18. I've always used sticker chart, too. This year our school theme was Together Everyone Achieves More, so I fad a football field bulletin board and the kids could move yards for homework and separate yards for behavior/cooperation. Certain days were trick play days when the kiddos could earn extra yards (30 or 40) for predetermined things like 80% accuracy, demonstrating self monitoring, supporting their group mates, etc. The kids loved that extra stuff!

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  19. I do a homework calendar each month that is attached to my monthly newsletter. Students who complete 10 activities from the calendar and return it to me get a prize from the prize box. I don't love it, but out teacher evaluation system requires us to provide evidence of 2-way communication and my newsletter was one-way. I added a questions/comments/concerns section to the HW calendar so parents could write me back if they wanted to (I haven't had one write in the section yet though)

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  20. I stopped using sticker charts a few years ago. It was due to a crazy schedule and I just didn't have time to set them up. But not ONE kiddo asked about them so I decided not to use them anymore. Now I base "incentives" on each student's needs and usually not tied to trinkets.

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  21. We build the word "compliment" by earning group compliments across sessions. Once we have built the word, the kids have a choice time session.

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  22. I use a sticker chart too. With one of my students I used a happy face or sad face, with him deciding what type of day he had. If he said he had a good day, when in truth he didn't we proceeded to talk about why he didn't. After a set length of time he got to choose a reward. It worked great! We were able to move from a week to two weeks to 12 weeks without much of a problem (behavior was the reason for the incentive).

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  23. I use sticker charts. My students work really hard for smelly stickers!

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  24. My students roll dice and move around a game board I made on my bulletin board. It is a bit more random chance for prizes but definitely keeps them motivated.

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  25. I use sticker charts with stickers that tie into our weekly theme. My students also LOVE the smelly stickers, which can be tricky to find for some of the themes. We also used "Tweet for a Treat" (from Crazy Speech World)once a week. Students could write or verbalize about something they learned this week or answer a question from Miss Tweet to earn a treat. You couldn't tweet if your behavior wasn't sweet. Corny, I know, but it worked with K-2 kiddos:)

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  27. Each student gets a sticker for coming to speech and gets a prize for every ten stickers. They get to choose from several choices like five minutes on the iPad, taking their shoes off during speech, a new pencil or eraser, an extra sticker, etc. I used to give an extra sticker for completed homework but had the same problem as you. I also have a behavior chart where each student starts off with three smileys. If they misbehave, are disrespectful, etc., they lose smileys. As long as they still have one left they get a sticker. This has been great for some of my more difficult kiddos!

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  28. I use the sticker system, but have tried a ticket system in the past

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  29. Mm many of my students have specific behavior plans and earn points for specific time increments. I love your common core can idea and could easily adapt it into my day. Thank you for sharing this creative idea!

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  30. I use stamps and stickers for my preschool age students. I have a sticker chart for my k-5 students where they can earn a prize after so many stickers. I want to revise my system so I appreciate all of the ideas.

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  31. I can't wait to try this! I've had such little success this past school year with the stickers/homework chart. My pre-k kiddos use a punch card to earn prizes for hard work but this would be great for my K-1 kids!

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  32. This is great! It also sounds like a good way to quickly assess students. My school is a PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) school so we give out hi-fives and students collect them like money to spend at the school store. Thanks for sharing!

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  33. At the end of every session the student can choose a stamp, sticker, or dog picture ( pictures from tear off calendar). I mostly work with early childhood so it is immediate enough and they get to take it with them

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  34. I use stickers as incentives. Student just pick a sticker. I would love to implement this as an incentive.

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  35. I use stickers as incentives. Student just pick a sticker. I would love to implement this as an incentive.

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  36. I have used so many different systems over the years, but the latest consisted of earning points during therapy sessions for behavior and improved skills. Whoever earned the most points by the end of the month got to pick something from my prize box. I like your idea, too. Anything that works at "leveling the playing field" sounds wonderful to me!

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  37. I have saved my money with www.shoppingspout.com it was very enjoy ful to do shopping with shoppingspout.com you also try shopping with shoppingspout.

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  38. I use stickers and a prize box. I'm excited to use the cans. What a great idea!

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  39. This is such a great idea! Very cute.

    My students earn 2 stamps on their Speech Chart each speech session they have as long as they follow the rules and try hard. Each chart has room for 30 stamps so it takes about 15 sessions before they can pick out of the prize box. If I do five min artic with a student they usually earn one stamp. If they do homework assigned by be then they earn an extra stamp so long as it is signed by a speech helper (older friend, sibling, parent or guardian). On a very rare occasion I have given extra stamp to students that showed extra effort or superb kindness to others in the group.

    Next year I will have more older students (middle and high school) so if anyone has ideas for incentive programs or prizes I would appreciate it!

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  40. Oh I forgot to mention that if my students don't lose any stamps for the day the also get a sticker. That way the have an immediate reward also.

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  41. Love this! I used speech folders/sticker charts with rewards for returned homework last year, and ran into the same problems you did. I have been brainstorming something new for next year. This is such a cute idea and I love that it incorporates CCSS!

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  42. My students have specific behavior plans and earn points for specific time increments. Also use stamps throughout sessions.

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  43. I use a simple prize box as a reward for many things!
    twmorlan@gmail.com
    GoldCountrySLP

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  44. We use class points. Wendy 1stgradefirworks@gmail.com

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  45. Sticker charts mostly. Sometimes I make a classroom bulletin board where items are added to it daily and after so many items are accumulated then the kids get a party.

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  46. I too use sticker charts with a prize after a set number of stickers

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  47. I also use stickers and a prize box. They have a speech chart to fill with a set number of stickers to get to the prize box. I had issues with it this year with taking extra stickers and using large stickers to cover four boxes. Now I have very specific rules and same size stickers for all.

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  48. Allison, I absolutely LOVE THIS!! I do an incentive program using pint size paint cans (my friend's dad owns a paint store!) and each child has their name wrapped around their can where they keep our school wide "currency" called "colt cash" - they can use it to buy prizes out of my "Speech store" where things are priced. They also decorate their cans with their stickers, etc. I also started usng CLASS DOJO at the end of last school year and I want to do it FULL FORCE this year :) Thanks for the giveaway- this is an awesome idea! And you're right- adminstrators will give gold stars for this one ;)

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  49. The good old stand-by: sticker or stamp chart. Got it from Speaking of Speech and it has a prize granted periodically and sometimes the students gets two stamps. The kids enjoy it and get to visit the prize box. If it ain't broke don't fix it!

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  50. Many of my students are life skills. They earn class money for their checkbook and save money to earn towards monthly parties, prizes, etc.

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  51. I have the "Great Candy Race" in my room which I mostly use for my articulation students. 5 "x" on the chart equals one piece of candy, when they reach the end of the row they earn a game day where we get to play a game without a focus on speech. Every time the student comes to speech, they earn 1/2 of an "x." If they practice 1 or 2 days at home during the week they earn another 1/2 "x," 3-4 days they earn a full "x," and if they practice 5 days they earn 2 full "x's." The kids have to have their parents initial on their homework tracking sheet that is in their homework folder each time they practice and then we add their "x's" to the chart at the beginning of the week. I like it because the kids can see how many "x's" other students have and I get to talk about why others have more "x's" than them (i.e. they practice a lot at home!). It worked pretty well this year, it's amazing that kids can be motivated by something as small as earning a jolly rancher :-)

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  52. I use a sticker chart, it's pretty big! Each student has a page, they can earn 1 sticker for being at speech that day and 1 for giving 100% to reach their speech goals. i won't go into too much detail because it's part of a new product I am making for incentives and data tracking! I absolutely love this idea with the cans! Soo creative!

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  53. I use "speech bucks" - if the students come on their own they get $2, good behavior and following the rules throughout the session $2 and answering the word of the day $1. At the end of each trimester they get to "buy" prizes from me with their money :)

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  54. I use stickers and a treasure box. Treasure box when you collect 10 stickers!

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  55. all of my younger students work for stickers, the older ones get incentive sheets and work for a prize box.

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  56. I use stickers, smiley faces, and positive verbal reinforcement...notes to show teacher and parents! :)

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  57. I use a variety: stickers, returning hw sheets, prize box!

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  58. I use a variety of things... stickers, free time at end of session, prizes.

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  59. What a great idea! Thanks for sharing!

    Aersta

    thespeechclinic.wordpress.com

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Nicole Allison
SpeechPeeps